Monday, August 13, 2018

A Tragedy of a Man and the Other Woman

LISTENER

Aurora Dawn


  • 82
  • reviews

  • 41
  • helpful votes

  • 91
  • ratings



 A Tragedy of a Man and the Other Woman 

Overall  ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
    
5 out of 5 stars
Performance  ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
    
5 out of 5 stars
Story  ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
    
4 out of 5 stars
Reviewed: 08-07-18
This touching and often painful story chronicles the life of a young girl captivated by an older man who is obsessed by the wife he loved and lost to Alzheimers. Told as a first person memoir from the girl's point of view, this story has the same lyrical quality I've come to expect of Poznansky's work. Lenny, the broken and obsessive husband, Anita, the wife and Ben, Lenny's son by his first wife engage in the kind of psychological struggle only a family can, haunted always by the lingering ghost of his first wife Natasha.
This story, like most great dramas, isn't always easy to hear, but you'll find yourself unable to leave it alone and the gentle, compelling voice of narrator Heather Hogan makes it a listening pleasure.

Saturday, August 11, 2018

When Love Sparks Danger, get ready for an explosion!

Twenty-one Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and bestselling authors bring you a heart-pounding collection of stories, never before published, all in one amazing romantic suspense boxed set.

From around the edges of every day existence lurks betrayal, greed, and death.

With every turn of the page, feel the heat of adrenaline as fear lights up the night. Fight alongside the tenacious heroes and heroines as they battle for survival. They'll put everything on the line to thwart the evil coming after them. 

They want to trust in the power of love. But is it enough?

Let the adventures begin...

Judith Lucci – RUN for your life
Stephany Tullis – Blue Lady's MISSION UNDER FIRE
Fiona Quinn – Cold Red
Anna Celeste Burke – Lily's Homecoming Under Fire
Margaret A. Daly- Monsters in my Closet
Linda Watkins - The Witches of Storm Island, Book I: The Turning
Tamara Ferguson - Two Hearts Under Fire
Suzanne Jenkins - Running with Horses
Inge-Lise Goss – Diamonds and Lies
S.R. Mallery – Tender Enemies
Jinx Schwartz - Baja Get Away
Uvi Poznansky - Virtually Lace
Kathryn Knight - The Haunting of Hillwood Farm
Stephanie Queen - Ace Under Fire 
Casi McLean - Reign Of Fire
Valerie J. Clarizio – The Code Enforcer
Chris Patchell - Deception Bay
Aaron Paul Lazar - The Asylum: a Carmen Garcia romantic suspense novel
Alyssa Richards - Chasing Secrets
K.M. Hodge - Summer of '78
Pamela Fagan Hutchins - Buckle Bunny


 Be the first to read these 21 novels 
Pre-order now
Nook ★ Apple  Kobo 

Friday, August 10, 2018

Does it excite the nerves, fire signals up there, between regions of her brain?


Check this out on Chirbit

She is looking out the window. 
Perhaps she is immersing herself in the grays and purples quivering there, on the other side of the glass, reaching a blur in the cold October sunlight. Perhaps, with great patience she is waiting there, waiting for the night, for the darkest hour, which is when her image may finally appear. It will come to the surface in front of her as if it were a sunken spirit, rising from the deep. Out of nowhere. 
For now she seems lost, searching for something—perhaps her reflection—in vain. 
I worry about mom, about the little things, which to someone else—someone who does not know her as I do—may seem trivial, insignificant. I worry she is missing her pearl earrings. I must find them for her. The little hole in her earlobe has shrunk away, turning somehow to flesh. 
In a whisper I say, “Mommy?” and wonder how the air vibrates over the tender membrane of her eardrum, how it changes into noise, how she gets it when pitch rises, when it falls. 
Can she sense the change? 
At what point does it translate, somehow, into meaning? By what path does it penetrate, going deeper? Does it excite the nerves, fire signals up there, between regions of her brain? Does it make some sense, at least at times? Is there any point in talking to her? Is she listening? Can she detect the thin sound—scratched like an old, overused vinyl record—which is coming faintly from behind, from the far end of this space? Can she understand the words? Is there sorrow in her? Is there hope?



★ Love reading? Treat yourself to a family saga ★
The complete series: 

Volume I: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
AudiobookAmazon US ★ Amazon UKiTunes 
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Volume II: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
Audiobook: Amazon US ★ Amazon UK ★ iTunes
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Volume I & II, woven together: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
AudiobookAmazon US Amazon UK ★ iTunes
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

"There is an air of mystery about the book that runs from the beginning to the final pages, but that also draws the reader in and makes the book difficult to put down." 
- Kathy Parsons, Top 1000 Reviewer

Make it all rise up in smoke


Check this out on Chirbit

The moment I come out of the bedroom—trying to forget what’s just happened between Ben and me—that’s the moment I see Lenny standing there, next to the entrance door. He takes a step forward to reach me, which alerts me at once to a threat, ‘cause I’ve seen him jealous before.
Me, I can tell how he must be feeling right now, ‘cause I’ve been there myself. From time to time, I would drive myself crazy thinking about him and Natasha, about her coming back here, or him going away with her. Then like, I would fly at him, with fire in my heart, crying that I hate, hate, hate him, and that I couldn't take his secrets no more, and whatever! And no matter what Lenny would say, I would end up going into a jealous rage. 
Rage, it can like, scorch everything around you, and make it all rise up in smoke, till you don’t hardly know who’s your friend and who—your enemy, so you can’t really trust no one. And most of all, you can’t trust the one you hold dear.  
At such moments I find that I miss being with my ma, who threw me out of her place long ago. I miss her, because inside—where no one else can see—I’m still a child, and because with her I’m at ease, and I don’t have to torture myself, and I don’t have doubts about nothing, ‘cause she makes things cut and dried, even if she has to slap me for it. 
So even though we’re married now, I don’t really feel I belong here, in this place. An outcast: that’s me. 
So I storm past him—but Lenny lays his hand on me. Grabbing me by the shoulder, he brings me to a standstill. 
Stop! Stop, Anita,” he says. “We have to talk.”
“Whatever,” I say, “I’m done talking,” even though we both reckon that like, the only thing I’ve swapped with him since this morning was my silence for his. 
And he goes, “Maybe you are—but I am not.”
And I don’t say nothing, ‘cause like, what’s the point? Between his son and me, I bet I know whose story he’s gonna believe.
And so he presses on, “There is something, Anita, something I must tell you.”
“What,” I say. “You leaving me again, Lenny?”

Anita in My Own Voice


★ Love reading? Treat yourself to a family saga ★
The complete series: 

Volume I: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
AudiobookAmazon US ★ Amazon UKiTunes 
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Volume II: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
Audiobook: Amazon US ★ Amazon UK ★ iTunes
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Volume I & II, woven together: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
AudiobookAmazon US Amazon UK ★ iTunes
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

"So much more could be said... but that would be robbing the reader of the joy of discoveries that Poznanasky accomplishes in this profound novel." 
Grady Harp, HALL OF FAME reviewer

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

The Story of A Man And the Other Woman

I'm thrilled to find this review, written by book reviewer Aurora Dawn, for my Women's Fiction novel and first-in-the-series, My Own Voice.
Check it out:

on August 6, 2018
This touching and often painful story chronicles the life of a young girl captivated by an older man who is obsessed by the wife he loved and lost to Alzheimers. Told as a first person memoir from the girl's point of view, this story has the same lyrical quality I've come to expect of Poznansky's work. Lenny, the broken and obsessive husband, Anita, the wife and Ben, Lenny's son by his first wife engage in the kind of psychological struggle only a family can, haunted always by the lingering ghost of his first wife Natasha.
This story, like most great dramas, isn't always easy read, but you'll find yourself unable to leave it alone and these characters will stay with you long after you've finished it.

Don't you dare

And so I find myself standing here, on the threshold of where I grew up, feeling utterly awkward. I knock, and a stranger opens the door. The first thing that comes to mind: what is she doing here? The second thing: she is young, much too young for him. The third: her hair. Red.  
I try not to stare—but to my astonishment, this girl with the kittenish eyes seems to be my age, so much younger than I have previously expected. Her name is the one thing I know for sure: Anita. She moves fast, and with a slight sway of the hips, just like my mother, which makes me want to forget, for a moment, that she is not. 
She lays a hand on my suitcase, and she drags the thing—as if it were a wounded hostage—into what used to be my room. I walk in behind her, captivated, at each step, by folds playing across her tight, short skirt. 
“There,” says Anita.
And she kicks the thing to the corner of the room, shoving it along the way from side to side to make it fit, somehow, under the shelf, where some of my old childhood knickknacks are still on display. 
And there, half hidden behind my old baseball mitt, is a flimsy metal frame with a dusty glass, under which is a picture I have nearly forgotten: a picture of my family from ages ago. 
Here is me, a ten year old boy smiling timidly, with a metal brace shining across the front teeth. Here is dad, hugging me with his right hand, and mom, hugging me with her left. The ring on her finger happens to catch the light. Their cheeks nearly touch, because they were such a perfect fit—or so I thought.   
Meanwhile, Anita turns on her heels to ask me, “You tired?” 
“No,” I feel compelled to lie, because who is she to ask me anything. 
“OK, fine,” she says, shrugging. “Want some warm milk or something, before bed?” 
To which I say, “What, you think I’m a baby?” 
With one swift step Anita is right here beside me, which takes me entirely by surprise. With no shame whatsoever, she looks me up and down and bursts out laughing, a deep, throaty kind of a laugh. 
“You? A baby? Oh, no,” she says. “Definitely not that. What are you, twenty-five now?”
“Twenty-seven.”
“Your father told me so much about you.” 
“Really? He did?” 
“I feel like I know you already,” she points playfully at the picture. “See there, how tight they used to hold you?”
I shrug, and she goes on, “I can almost hear them say, Don’t touch this, Ben. Don’t touch that. I can almost hear you, too, like, Don’t touch me here. Don’t touch me there. Just don’t. Don’t you dare.”

Ben in The White Piano


★ Love reading? Treat yourself to a family saga ★
The complete series: 

Volume I: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
AudiobookAmazon US ★ Amazon UKiTunes 
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Volume II: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
Audiobook: Amazon US ★ Amazon UK ★ iTunes
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Volume I & II, woven together: 
Audible: USUKFRDE
AudiobookAmazon US Amazon UK ★ iTunes
PaperbackAmazon ★ Barnes&Noble

Monday, August 6, 2018

Reader's Biblical Delight!

Dolores Ayotte is the author of A Woman's Voice (and other self-help books.) She is an inspirational writer and one of the best reviewers on Amazon. Here is what she said about my historical Fiction trilogy, The David Chronicles:

on December 14, 2014
Book 1
The setting in "Rise to Power" is in the appropriate Biblical era but the characters have what appears to be a more modern day method of thinking. Or is this really an age old way of operating and not modern at all? Ms. Poznansky is merely saying it likes she sees it. The discerning reader soon realizes a more sinister plot may have taken place as she spurs us on to think outside the box and entertain all kinds of possibilities. Most of us are very familiar with the Bible story about the young boy David who slays Goliath...however, I encourage you to read this version of his story. You will get an x-ray view of not only how David's mind possibly worked but also of the way Ms. Poznansky's mind captivatingly works in order to entice her reading audience. She does not leave a stone unturned in this intriguing Biblical story as David narrates his tale with and through the eyes of Ms. Poznansky. Watch David come alive with all his human faults, frailties, and fears as he diligently searches for his path to power. "Life in the shadow of death"...is it really that exciting after all? You be the judge.

Book 2
In "A Peek at Bathsheba", the reader continues to get a glimpse of King David's his all-too-human side. In Ms. Poznansky's portrayal of him, his alleged weaknesses hang out like a sore thumb and make it difficult to admire him as King of the House of David who reigns over the tribe of Judea. He has every ambition to influence the other eleven tribes and perhaps rule the nation. Although King David craves a peaceful resolution, his chief general Joav chooses
disastrous triumphs" in his effort to accomplish victory in "his ill-advised civil war against the eleven tribes of Israel". With the untimely death of Joav's younger brother Asahel in one such battle, King David is advised to no longer trust Joav in what appears to be his own quest for power. King David himself is already having his own doubts and fears about Joav but now one of his spiritual advisors has confirmed his very thoughts. But soon it appears that Joav is not his only concern...

King David with his many wives, materialistic cravings, and perceived desire for power are only surpassed by his covetous nature in his pursuit of Bathsheba. He is obviously not above adultery and although Bathsheba does little to ward off his advances...afterall how could she possibly refuse a King?

Book 3
"The Edge of Revolt" is the third and final installment in the Chronicle of David Series. Although I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books in this series, Book 3 is my favorite thus far. It is penned by the same gifted author....well-written in Author Uvi Poznansky's unique and captivating style. However, it offers closure to the life and eventual death of King David. He has led a ponderous life, a gifted psalmist...filling up scroll after scroll, yet persecuted by the realization of his own humanity and need for redemption. Haunted by his love for Bathsheba, the taking of her when she was married to Uriah, and his subsequent act of perpetuating Uriah's murder on the battlefield clearly demonstrates one of the many reasons for the spiritual and emotional turmoil in King David's life. Will he ever find the peace of mind he so deeply desires before his death...?

What an incredible opportunity to find all three volumes of the Chronicles of David in this Boxed Set. It's a great gift, not only for yourself, but to be generously shared with others.

Inspirational Author & Book Reviewer ~ Dolores Ayotte
I'm Not Perfect and It's Okay