Monday, July 29, 2013

Fascinating and Deeply Involving Prose and Poetry

Back to back reviews, last night and today, for Twisted! How much fun is that!
Sheila Deeth is a top 1000 Amazon reviewer, and the author of several books of biblical fiction. So I truly value her opinion about the biblically-inspired hell in my book, and am thrilled that she focused on the woman's voice expressed in my book. 


5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and deeply involving prose and poetryJuly 29, 2013
This review is from: Twisted (Kindle Edition)
What is woman? Uvi Poznansky's four curious tales in her Twisted collection find various answers to this question. Is a woman denied existence if we hide her name, or if we define her just by relationships to man? Does the female sculpture come first or second to the creator's hand? Does death create, destroy or preserve, and can imagination fly?

A haunting story of Job's nameless wife starts this short collection and sets the tone. With pleasing plays on words and history, evoking intriguing shades of Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, the author renders the Biblical story of Job into a timeless world where Job's wife stands in need of a name.

It's not hard, after these pleasing Biblical allusions, for the reader to identify with a slab of clay in the next tale and share its search for the creator's purpose. But the slab is woman and the purpose is filled with beauty and pain.

From lilting poetry to feline's fearsome claw, these pieces draw the reader in, enticing with intriguing depths and surprising with sudden light. Twisted, puzzling, but perfectly put together, the collection has the feel that it was meant to be this way, no random grouping of fiction but a twisted exploration that turns and returns this reader to the singular question: What is woman?

Disclosure: The author kindly gave me an ecopy of this book with a request for my honest review.

2 comments:

  1. Thank you for a really enjoyable read, Uvi. And your Biblically inspired hell was fascinating and intriguing. I really enjoy your light touch with deep references.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw... My pleasure! It is very rewarding to hear this from you Sheila!

      Delete