Wednesday, July 25, 2012

How can I Reach Your Temple?

At first I snarl, snaking 
In the dirt around your foot, 
I wish to shoot up, lifting 
My body from the soot 

I coil up, all around you  
Weaving shadows into your light 
Your white, now brushed with my blue  
Is no longer pure--not quite--  

And as I reach, your neck to clutch    
And lean in with a hiss  
Your head floats off, now out of touch  
So far out of my kiss  

How can I reach your temple?  
I can't, now I know  
You are so high, so gentle  
You tremble in the flow... 



Here I imagine myself as a transparent snake rising up, one scale after another, one facet after another, around this paper sculpture. The sculpture is made of four parts: 

  1. The foot at the bottom, which I shaped as an elegant, curvy pedestal 
  2. The faceted design in the middle, which I created out of a single sheet of paper, with no cutting or glueing at all (merely by light scoring and hand pressure)
  3. The faceted 'neck', which I brought to a single point; 
  4. And the crown on top, which I set afloat above that point.  
Curious about my paper sculptures? Take a look at my Plucked Porcupine or my Paper Peacock

9 comments:

  1. This really is awesome writing Uvi - I too love poetry - used to write loads of it when i was young and going through hard times - well written and a pleasure to read :)

    Sye

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    1. Thank you Sye! It's just a playful thing for me, we should keep being playful as we were as children!

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  2. Wow! I love the poem and I'm fascinated by the sculpture and how it's made. Thank you.

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  3. How innovative & creative, a lovely poem & a wonderful sculpture :-)

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    1. Thank you so much, Shyam. I love reading your work!

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  4. Replies
    1. Thank you Elaina! Good to see you here!

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  5. What a beautiful paper sculpture--it Would be a beautiful light if there were a way to illuminate from the inside out without burning it up in the process. Wait! Isn't this a famous metaphor of some sort?

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