Sunday, February 8, 2015

Richly layered work of art

P.C. Zick, the gifted author of several genres--contemporary fiction, romance, and nonfiction--won various awards for her essays, columns, editorials, articles, and fiction. She is also an avid reader. I am thrilled to find her in-depth review of my novel, Apart From Love, on her 'Book Review Friday' column, as well as on Amazon. This is what she writes:

on February 8, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Here is an astounding book from Uvi Poznansky with her work of literary fiction, Apart from Love. Ms. Poznansky is a multi-talented author and artist, and with this novel, she creates a multi-faceted and multi-layered work of art.

The story is told through the first person narrations of Anita, the new wife of Lenny and step-mother to the other narrator, Ben. The point of view is unique because the story is more about the love between Ben's parents, Lenny and Natasha, than the other two, who form another sort of love story. Ben's separation from his home for ten years only shows the level of dysfunction in this family. I use the word "dysfunction" with disdain sometimes because it is overused to the point where it sometimes means very little. But if any family is dysfunctional, it is this one.
During Ben's absence, the lack of communication with his mother and father is evident when he comes home. For a decade, he assumed his talented pianist mother is out on tour, when in fact, his father is hiding something quite important from his son about Natasha.

In the meantime, Lenny has remarried Anita who is one year younger than Ben. She's a beauty--a younger version of Natasha. It's complicated and completely dysfunctional in the true meaning of that word.

Literary techniques abound in Apart from Love. The author skillfully creates symbols and metaphors with the white piano in the living room, the antique mirror in the bedroom, and the tape recorder on the balcony. The point of view represents the author's skill in writing dialogue that characterizes both Ben and Anita. It's obvious when switching between chapters who is the narrator, even though Ms. Poznansky tells the reader if it's Ben or Anita in each chapter title. That's helpful, but with her paintbrush, she paints prose that is distinct for each one.

Alzheimers rears its horrifying head in parts of the story, as does the family's inability to know how to deal with it. Insanity hovers at the edges of all the characters as well, presenting the reader with that fine line between genius and the alternative.

If that's not enough, Lenny is a writer who uses the words of others to create his stories. The blurred lines between reality and fiction are explored in this intimate look at how authors sometimes steal identities from others to draw portraits of real life. It's haunting in its honesty of how an author works. The "record, rewind, record" element of the story reminds me that all reality is really the fiction of our imaginations.

Uvi Poznansky is a talented author who says in her bio, "I paint with my pen, and write with my paintbrush." The cover of Apart from Love and the content in between are assurances that this is true.

2 comments:

  1. I loved this book. Such raw honesty within the pages of this one. Thank you for writing it.

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    1. Music to my ears, Patricia! What a great, intelligent, in-depth review!

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